TO FORM A SPOONERISM WHEN GIVEN TWO WORDS:
Exchange the leading letters from each word, up to, but not including, the first vowel, until you have come up with two brand new dictionary words.

Warning!
At times, you may need to exchange more than one letter from either word, or you may need to exchange two or more letters from both words to form your correctly answered Spoonerism.

WHO DOESN'T LIKE A GOOD HINT?
Take a good look at the image and/or the text caption "hint" before starting the next video. This will prepare you for playing PunnyFuzzles, as each and every puzzle has its own unique hint to help you work out the solution.

Never under estimate the power of a good visual clue, as we have spent countless hours, and many long nights selecting just the right images and captions to help you select the correct solution for each and every PunnyFuzzle puzzle.

" F-A-C-E  is the hint to this sample puzzle"

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"Arizona is home to the Grand Canyon”

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Martin Chilton 8/2015

“PunnyFuzzles is more than just a game, it is a teaching platform. It is well-suited for hand-held learning and playing. It is a brand new type of puzzle that never existed until now. I think PunnyFuzzles maintains the largest collection of Spoonerisms in the world, but I’ll have to double-check that.”

The Reverend William Archibald Spooner was born in London on July 22, 1844. He was an albino and suffered defective eyesight, and it is thought that this caused some of his verbal confusions which were later dubbed “spoonerisms”. These included “it is kisstomary to cuss the bride”. Spooner, who died on August 29, 1930, was an Anglican priest, scholar and writer. He studied at New College, Oxford, before lecturing there for 60 years, in history, philosophy and divinity.

He was apparently an amiable, kind and hospitable man, though absent-minded. He also had a keen intellect, which is where his problems began. His tongue barely kept up with his thought processes, resulting in an unintentional interchange of sounds, producing a phrase with a meaning entirely different from the one intended.

That is what is now called a spoonerism.
The more agitated the good Reverend became, the more acute the manifestation of sound switching. There are a number of well substantiated oddities of a more subtle kind: “Was it you or your brother who was killed in the Great War?” for example. “Spooner is buried In Grasmere Cemetery in the Lake District”.

Try our new audio puzzle. Listen for the clue in the lyrics.

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